Just To Be Sure

Just To Be Sure

Imbued with the languid atmosphere of human connection, and moving (mostly) to the rhythm of fine classical scores, Just To Be Sure is like a psychological reprieve from the cascade of horror movies seen in the last season. No psychopath or allegory distracts from witty lines and mellow performances; no car chase or manipulator disrupts real feelings…

That Good Night

That Good Night

Dramatic depictions of mortality tend to tell a story of perspective and redemption. While Eric Styles’ screen adaptation of NJ Crisp’s play offers no major exception, the fact that John Hurt assumes the lead-role following his own real-life terminal diagnosis adds a profound dimension and pathos to this affecting film. Handed with the grim prognosis…

The Snowman

The Snowman

More psychopathic cinema than coherent drama, The Snowman is a jumble of disjointed puzzle pieces, of which some do not even belong to the central picture. At the centre is Harry Hole (Michael Fassbender), a brilliant but alcoholic police inspector in Oslo, who is now excluded from major cases. He maintains friendly relations with his ex-lover, Rakel…

Yerma

Yerma

An elemental feel pervades this radical revival of Federico Garcia Lorca’s 1934 tragedy. Simon Stone’s version uproots it from 20th-century rural Spain and transplants it in current-day London. His production is blunt, rather than poetic, focusing on the eponymous character, emphasising the physical. Yerma is barren-ness in Spanish. Despite conversations that suggest how the house…

Final Portrait

Final Portrait

The appeal of Final Portrait grows and grows. It is an episode in the life of Alberto Giacometti who is renown for his sculptures and paintings. Written and directed by Stanley Tucci, the film is based on a true account documented in a book by James Lord, an American writer and art critic, about an event of…

Loves Me/Loves Me Not

Loves Me/Loves Me Not

JC Clapham tells us quite a lot of stories in his new story-telling comedy, many of them funny, some of them poignant, all of them heartfelt. Loves Me/Loves Me Not is a self-deprecating, charming, bone-deep portrayal of falling in love, losing it, finding oneself, plus all the heartaches and joys snuggled up in between. It is a…

Mother!

Mother!

From the very first shots Darren Aronofsky’s Mother! unsettles, as an amorphous membrane heaves and pulsates, like some breathing organism. And, at the same time the walls of a house seem to be transmogrified, there are surreal impressions of fire and destruction. It will be a long time — a long time after we have left the…