Yerma

Yerma

An elemental feel pervades this radical revival of Federico Garcia Lorca’s 1934 tragedy. Simon Stone’s version uproots it from 20th-century rural Spain and transplants it in current-day London. His production is blunt, rather than poetic, focusing on the eponymous character, emphasising the physical. Yerma is barren-ness in Spanish. Despite conversations that suggest how the house…

Loves Me/Loves Me Not

Loves Me/Loves Me Not

JC Clapham tells us quite a lot of stories in his new story-telling comedy, many of them funny, some of them poignant, all of them heartfelt. Loves Me/Loves Me Not is a self-deprecating, charming, bone-deep portrayal of falling in love, losing it, finding oneself, plus all the heartaches and joys snuggled up in between. It is a…

The One

The One

A man (Mark Storen) and a woman (Georgia King) encounter each other following “a summer of break-ups” when after a long time they find themselves single again. They make conversation, make love, fall in love. Soon, it has been two years since the nameless couple lived together, and things seem to be going well. Then,…

Mirror's Edge

Mirror's Edge

“Who am I?” asks Kai (Rebecca Poynton), if internally to herself. An otherwise quintessential Aussie but for her yellow skin, the Melburnian arrives at Lake Tyrrell in the regional town of Sea Lake, angry and embittered by prejudices she has had to endure in a white country. Here, she encounters motel-operator, Leanne (Rachel Shrives), an…

(de)construct

(de)construct

Watch us speak, watch us, hear us. We do, uncomfortable, though, it sometimes is, in Cera Maree Brown’s staging of her rich yet delicate play, whose title conjures the addressing of one’s multitude of selves, in order, perhaps, to define our authentic nature. Four young people embark on a series of body movements in an expression…

ODE

ODE

With a rapidly ageing population dementia has become more and more prevalent in our society; over 350,000 Australians are known to live with the debilitating condition. Karen Sibbing’s ODE offers a window into what that is like: drawing from the experience of watching her own grandmother succumb to it, she imagines a world as seen through…

The Book of Mormon

The Book of Mormon

I have noted before that one of the most delicious sounds in theatre is total silence among the audience. But this profanity-rich, joyfully-satirical work — led by an incandescent Ryan Bondy and, following the musical with every company so far, the talented A.J. Holmes —  rocks viewers through the entire running time into waves of…