Final Portrait

Final Portrait

The appeal of Final Portrait grows and grows. It is an episode in the life of Alberto Giacometti who is renown for his sculptures and paintings. Written and directed by Stanley Tucci, the film is based on a true account documented in a book by James Lord, an American writer and art critic, about an event of…

Mother!

Mother!

From the very first shots Darren Aronofsky’s Mother! unsettles, as an amorphous membrane heaves and pulsates, like some breathing organism. And, at the same time the walls of a house seem to be transmogrified, there are surreal impressions of fire and destruction. It will be a long time — a long time after we have left the…

Kiki, Love to Love

Kiki, Love to Love

Bursting with colours of grapefruit flesh and fig, and moving to the vigorous rhythm of copulating wildlife, Kiki, Love to Love is like a collection of sensual frames from several dramas: scenes meant to be reprieves from main plots to delve into characters’ intimate moments, or distractions of yearning moods. Only, here, these distractions are in…

(de)construct

(de)construct

Watch us speak, watch us, hear us. We do, uncomfortable, though, it sometimes is, in Cera Maree Brown’s staging of her rich yet delicate play, whose title conjures the addressing of one’s multitude of selves, in order, perhaps, to define our authentic nature. Four young people embark on a series of body movements in an expression…

My Cousin Rachel

My Cousin Rachel

“Did she? Didn’t she? Who is to blame?” asks pensive Philip (Sam Claflin), in the prologue of My Cousin Rachel, the latest feature by Roger Michell (Notting Hill), through which this sense of amorphous uncertainty shall resonate to the end. Each time Philip thinks he knows, something or somebody pulls the scenario out of shape. Here,…

ODE

ODE

With a rapidly ageing population dementia has become more and more prevalent in our society; over 350,000 Australians are known to live with the debilitating condition. Karen Sibbing’s ODE offers a window into what that is like: drawing from the experience of watching her own grandmother succumb to it, she imagines a world as seen through…

The Sense of an Ending

The Sense of an Ending

Consummate acting is in overflowing abundance in The Sense of an Ending. With deftness, Jim Broadbent plays Tony, a cantankerous retiree running a small shop that sells vintage cameras, while Charlotte Rampling is the self-assured Veronica, Tony’s first love from university, with whom he becomes reacquainted, decades after an ugly break-up by their former, immature selves.…